Monday, February 2, 2009

Welcome to Twebrew School: Shabbat

The concept of a Sabbath, a day of rest, came to the world through the Jewish people. Shabbat, as the Sabbath day is called in Hebrew, is the day on which a person has an opportunity to recharge his/her batteries, metaphorically speaking, and to remember precisely how humankind is part of a spiritual world as well as the tangible physical world.

A day of rest means more than just spending 24 hours lounging in one’s easy-chair. There are rituals and customs, laws and traditions, all of which are meant to honor, guard and sanctify the seventh day of the week. Twebrew School: Shabbat has been created in order to give our readers a taste of the deep meaning behind Shabbat and its most well-known rituals.

On March 5, 2010, the National Jewish Outreach Program will be sponsoring Shabbat Across America and Shabbat Across Canada, a continent wide celebration of Shabbat that highlights not only the beauty of Shabbat, but also the importance of community.

Twebrew School: Shabbat will focus on Friday night rituals. Over the course of the next four weeks (beginning on Monday February 8, 2010), the new Twebrew School: Shabbat segments will be posted on the Twebrew School blog at twebrewschool.org.

We hope you enjoy them. Please feel free to email us with any comments, questions or suggestions.

The following topics will be covered in Twebrew School: Shabbat

What Is Shabbat
If Shabbat Is Saturday, Why Does It Begin On Friday Night?
The Mitzvah of Lighting Shabbat Candles
How To Light Shabbat Candles
Who Lights The Shabbat Candles?
Shabbat’s Angel Companions
Singing About the “Woman of Valor”
A Blessing On Their Heads
Birkat Ha’banim: Blessing Boys, Blessing Girls
Setting the Shabbat Table
Kiddush Wine
How To Make Kiddush (Friday Night)
The Ritual Hand Washing
The Bread of the Sabbath
Blessing The Bread
The Friday Night Feast
Guests, The Special Element of the Shabbat Table
Sing the Songs of Shabbat
The Reward of Honoring Shabbat
Guard and Remember

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